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Chapters 5-6: Flipped Mastery Model


The first four chapters really cover the basics and logistics of flipped the classroom and the benefits it holds. Chapters five and six introduce and make a case for the blending of the flipped classroom and the mastery model (flipped-mastery model).

The authors discuss how the flipped-mastery model that students are the ones pushing their learning. They work through the content at their own level of learning and proceed when the student has mastered that skill set. In chapter six, the authors mention that the flipped-mastery model teaches students the value of learning instead of "playing school." What are you thoughts on that comment? Agree or disagree as you please.

Comments

  1. I love the idea of the mastery classroom, John Vogel does something very similar to this in his class. All students know what is expected of them to learn and utilize but they arrive at it from different avenues doing different projects. I am going to try this next semester with some independent learning students in drawing and in Photo III. I will have specifics that they need to incorporate but they will create a plan for themselves for the semester using various routes to achieve their goals.
    I feel like the mastery model will need to be incorporated in steps with my other large classes.
    Trial and error is best way for me to learn, but it certainly isn't the only way! haha

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    1. Very exciting! You certainly have to have all your materials very well organized and place a lot of trust in the students. It is a good opportunity for students to take responsibility for their own learning. :)

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  2. In my years, I've seen a lot of students playing school (as a middle and high school student, I was even one of them). They just want to be hand-fed and take the easiest route to a good grade. In college, I took more ownership of my learning because I was studying what I wanted to study (for the most part). Students must see the value in what they are doing, and sometimes the value is not from WHAT you are learning but HOW you are learning to learn. Did that make sense? I wish I would have discovered that sooner in my schooling.

    On the other hand, "10 ring circuses" are hard to maintain. I can see doing a modified version of this down the road. I would like he students to work at their own pace within a unit, but instead of having them move onto the next unit, they would get to choose ways to apply the knowledge they have mastered. That way they are not slowed down, but I'm not teaching 10 different topics at the same time.

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    1. Shawn,

      I couldn't have said it better. I completely agree with both comments. I "played school" and then when I got to college, I was shocked! I "learned" the content to get a good grade in high school, but I didn't really "learn" the content.

      I was thinking how can I maintain a 10 ring circus?!?! I could easily have students on unit 1 and other students are unit 20. I know it is possible and I am organized, but I feel it would take a lot of planning and time. I love your idea about using the knowledge they learn and applying in other ways.

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    2. Shawn, I was certainly playing school. I often joke that I didn't truly learn how to read until I got to college. I think a lot of it has to do with the maturity level of the typical student. That might be why when we see these students that are so self driven that they stand out among their classmates. The option of choice does help with the motivation issues.

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  3. I agree with this statement that some students just "play school". What they have done is just memorized the facts of the event/topic being covered but when you ask them to explain what they could have done to prevent or change the outcome of the event they struggle with it. By putting the learning on them they have to look at the different aspects of the event. You would have to make this a main objective in each lesson. By doing this you are making the students use critical thinking skills that will be necessary for them to be successful later on in life. Students need to be able to more than just re say what they have learned they need to be able to explain it is important and other comes could have happened if key events were different. When I talk about events I referring to different events in history and how it effects the future.

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    1. "Students need to be able to do more than just re say what they have learn..." You are exactly right. Can they take the information presented and apply it to difficult and very open questions? Can they apply it to the point that they can make a quality and informed argument? Good thoughts!

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  4. I do believe it's easier for some students to play at school rather than really learn. Unfortunately information can be learned for the moment and not internalized. Learning would take on a whole new look for students if the responsibility for it to happen was placed in their hands. Would they take it seriously?
    I like the idea of the flipped-mastery class although there is a lot to wrap one's mind around in considering all that must be done for it to take place. I wonder if this concept would be easier at a middle or high school level where a teacher's focus is mainly on one subject as opposed to elementary where all subjects are taught by one teacher.

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  5. I really like this idea for one main reason, when a student does not master a topic, it affects what they are learning during the next topic and the next and the next... I had some students struggle with place value during our first unit this year. I worked with them but it continues to come back to haunt them in almost every topic I have taught since. If they had stayed on that topic until they "got it" then the next topics would have been easier for them.
    However, the thought of organizing everything that needs to be done for this process to work makes my head spin! I think slow steps of videos first, then moving towards the mastery idea in a year or 2 would be do-able.
    I really like the comment from Jennifer Douglass about making it more fun by calling them levels, etc. I agree, I think without some incentive some will stay on the first topic forever.
    And finally, would this change our grade cards, moving to mastering objectives instead of grades. More work for us, but I think a better picture for students and parents to see where their child is and what is expected of them.

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  6. I also like the flipped mastery learning so the students can master a topic before going on & getting mixed up in later topics. Seems it would really help on Math skills.Pearson has lots of "additional practice" for topics not mastered, and I am not always diligent to follow up, even though my work and differentiation is done for me by automatically assigning extra help in Reading & Math. I need to teach a mini lesson to students on "additional Practice" sessions, and stress why that will help them in the future topics, and devise a better personal tracking system for my records/progress monitoring. I would like the students to take responsibility for their own learning as the authors suggest. I like the authors' idea of creating multiple versions of summative assessments. They are right - "one size doesn't fit all".

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  7. As I have previously mentioned, I really see video lessons at the elementary level more for reteaching a skill rather than an introduction. However, the students who catch on quickly could view and move ahead more independently. So the possibility for easier differentiation would be very helpful.

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  8. I love the idea of students mastering a specific topic before they move on, however I wonder if that is always practical within the classroom. I want all students to always succeed and feel successful in everything that they do, and I think the mastery learning is a really great idea because it allows them to master one topic before they move on.

    That being said, what happens when there is a student or students who do not master of tickler topic right away nor do they master it for a very long time. I love the idea of students being able to master a specific topic before they move on, but if they don't master it then how would that affect their ability to feel successful within the classroom. I know their students to continue won't see you struggle with a particular topic for example adding, and I know that that will impact everything that the student learns and understands in the future.

    I do think that with the flipped classroom model that mastery learning would be easier for all students to achieve. I think that this is a really great tool for that because students could continually look back upon what was already taught and will continually have those refreshers available to them at any time that they need it. In addition, it would be a valuable tool to students who have already mastered the topic to have the tools available to them to look back on anytime they need a brief refresher.

    Finally, I think that mastery learning is even more fabulous for students to quickly understand material and are ready to extend what they already know and learn additional information. Sometimes it is hard to challenge the students who already understand the information because there's so much going on in the classroom and so many students who continually need me to help them understand the material. I think that it would be great to have a system in place in which students could learn at their own pace, and that would be meeting the needs of all students within the classroom rather than just the majority. I think that this tool would be a very easy way for teachers to differentiate their instruction based upon different academic levels of their students.

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  9. While I think mastery learning is a great idea, I think it is very difficult to put into practice. In learning a foreign language, you have to continue practicing, reviewing and delving deeper into the language to ever develop any level of proficiency. Our students are geared toward completing assignments and considering their work done, usually with as little thought as possible. I would like them to realize they are never done if they are truly going to learn and be able to use the language. I think the flipped classroom may provide opportunities to delve deeper and achieve that, but students have to buy-in. It is not like you complete a chapter and you never deal with that material again. In reality, you can never forget anything you learn and must incorporate everything. It takes a lot of practice, repetition and hard work. It just keeps building on itself, like math, for example. Not only that, but students have to be able to read, write, listen and speak in the language. There is always more that can be done. I wish I could make them see that getting a good grade means very little if they can't use the language. Students do control their learning in the sense that they are the ones who decide what they choose to learn and how well they learn it.

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