Skip to main content

Chapter 7: How to Implement the Flipped-Mastery Model


"We describe our classes as hubs of learning. The focus of the classroom is no longer on the teacher, but rather on the learning."  - Jonathan Bergmann and Aaron Sams
Chapter seven is on the implementation of the flipped-mastery model. There are a lot of great tips and things to keep in mind that the authors bring up. They discuss the number of years till they felt that the flipped-mastery model actually seemed to feel comfortable. They discuss training the students to function in their classes. They also describe the types of assessment that are necessary and are an effective means to measure learning.

What really stood out to me in this chapter was the quote I put to start this post. What do you think of the authors referring to their classes as "hubs of learning" in comparison to the traditional classroom?Do you feel that the way they describe the flipped-mastery model deserves such a title? Feel free to add any other thoughts you'd like to add about the chapter as well.

Comments

  1. I like the hubs of learning style the authors describe, because I think it better fits the needs of learners today. Students like collaboration and group work, and gravitate to the groups they need and work well with. Many distractions and discipline problems disappear or lessen with this style. I have found it does take modeling and works better with modeling, even though we feel time is precious and there isn't time for extensive modeling. I have found it does pay off, though. I have a couple classroom mascots I use to model with, and it seems to be effective.
    Yes, I feel their model deserves that title. It sounds like it takes the focus off the teacher, and highlights it on student learning, so students want to learn the content. It sounds like a more interesting learning environment for students than the traditional classroom model.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're exactly right. Modeling is key. Often frameworks fail due to lack of modeling. Set the expectations and set them high.

      Delete
  2. I would LOVE to set up my classroom in hubs of learning or checkpoints of learning. Art is almost 95% lab work and students progress through the labs or projects at different speeds with different skill levels.
    I do not think mastery will come to 100% of the students though as there are students here who love art and will always "master" the skills while we Have students here with no interest except for an escape period in their day along with students who are placed in this room because it fits into their schedule and they want an honors diploma. We also have the IEP students who are sometimes just on a survival trip through high school where art can be a saving grace and relaxing or one more stressful class to see their own inadequacies.
    The ideal room, the dream room, for any teacher, would be advanced classes with hubs of learning. I have that sometimes but it is rare. But I can steal chase the dream by incorporating some of these methods into my teaching.


    ReplyDelete
  3. "Hubs of Learning" is definitely fits the classroom of today because of the structure being more student-centered as opposed to teacher-centered. Here the responsibility is placed on the individual students to assist other students and to teach each other where the teacher is the mediator in a sense. It is important that students drive their own motivation because it is more beneficial if they are the one's deciding how much they want to learn. Unfortunately, with this model those students who are not motivated tend to rely on others to do it for them. The Flipped Model is a continuos work in progress and discover bugs that arise each time I try to implement something new in my classes. The video as a whole works for me most of the time to introduce the lesson although I do find some students do not follow along and when we begin the task, they are lost and I have to walk them through the video again. Frustration!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, and I think it goes back to the previous chapter when the authors' refer to students "playing school." These students are just expecting to be spoon fed information instead of seek it for themselves. I know I was certainly guilty of it! :)

      Delete
  4. Some classrooms today are "Hubs of Learning." I believe their model deserves that title.

    Since I teach second grade, I don't know how a "flipped mastery level model" classroom would look for us. I would love to talk to teachers who are using this model in lower elementary classrooms. I am anxious to see how classrooms will look in the years to come.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It certainly looks different the further you go down in grade levels. I have attempted to envision how I would handle "hubs of Learning" in lower elementary. I think I would essentially have a center for a specific unit of study. The resources would be available and students would have a specific outcome that they are to create. I know this would fly in the face of all constructivists, but a sample product would probably be necessary to create that sense of independence. I imagine lots of books and QR codes to websites/videos on specific topics. I think it would work well in science and social studies.

      Delete
  5. I do feel they could be thought of as "hubs of learning." Students will learn so much more when they are in charge of their own learning, even those who are slow to catch on to the idea at first. I have made my class much more student centered and am amazed, as are they!, at how much they can accomplish when they are steering their path.
    I love the concept of the interesting questions, so I know they must
    be engaged with the videos.
    I also like the 75% mastery of a topic to move on, with the opportunity to redo if you want to improve your grade. How amazing to be able to plan around their schedule. Kids are in so many activities and missing school for sickness. It would eliminate all of the stress if they continued on at their pace to work on "their" assignments. IF you missed a day, there is no make-up work, you just continue on! How freeing for me!! No more absence sheets!!
    My only question/fear is how do you set how much material a student should cover. I understand the sky is the limit for those who are higher, but what about those students who make take weeks to master a topic? Does this happen? What if they only get through half of the curriculum? How does that fit with our standards based assessments? I would feel comfortable, because they are mastering a topic instead of just trying and moving on. But what about the next teacher, who maybe doesn't do the mastery model? That student would be so far behind?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I would envision that a contract would be necessary with regular 1:1 conferences. The teacher would need to constantly aware of student progress and to make sure that they are moving at a proper pace. Maybe a set of timeline checkpoints would be necessary?

      Delete
  6. I would love to say my class is a hub of learning, yet every day I wonder if there is a better way to make sure my students are learning enough or what they should be. I think the need for self-motivation, as Lara says, is critical and not trying to get the work done without learning the material. There are students who are more about getting it done and getting a grade than actually having the knowledge. It is something I battle and wish they could appreciate the value of this as a practical life skill. I think we would also have to model and explain procedures and get them to buy-in to the process. Sometimes it is as simple as following the directions and taking it step by step. I think the authors have gotten to the point that they deserve the title, but I think it would take me quite a while to work out all the kinks and get it all ready to go. I will incorporate some elements. When we had our practice e-learning day, I discovered how many students need to have very explicit instructions and get them used to reading and following them. I also think it is consider whether what I want them to do is best-suited to a flipped, individual situation or a whole-class activity. I did have one student say he was really tired of looking at his computer screen!

    ReplyDelete
  7. I understand why they call their classroom hubs of learning. Students are broke into groups and are helping each other learn which puts the the responsibility on them. My concern with that, which I would think a lot of teachers have, is the students who don't have the incentive yet to be responsible for their learning. With teachers being assessed on their students learning it pretty scary to move this to this method and not be penalized for it in their evaluation. I know new learning method to school do take time to become the standard of learning. It just seems like the teacher would be spending most of their time making sure that the students who don’t have the drive or willing to just take a “D” in the class to put more effort into their learning.

    I’m also concerned with assessment in this teaching style. If you are letting students learn at their own pace you will have students who are worlds apart in the learning process. Do you then put due dates into this teaching style that requires to have checkpoints into your subject matter. Basically, are you telling students that they have to have units or lessons done by a particular date? If you do this then you don’t have student learning at their own pace. What do you do when you have students who do have the incentive to be responsible for their learning finish all the material that is required of the class? Do they then make your class a study hall or do you create more topics for that student to learn about? At some point you are going to have some student who only get through ½ of the required material and other students who have learned the required material and then some.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I love the idea of a "hub of learning." I think that collaboration and immediate feedback are very important parts of the students' learning processes. I agree with some comments above that wonder about some students lack of motivation. I also wonder what the authors do when students have mastered all the content (maybe that will be in the FAQ). I think students in my advanced class would be great at this as long as I modeled and held my expectations high. However, I would eventually like to do this with all my classes, so I worry about making sure everyone learned the core content (that which is necessary to be successful in the next grade). I don't like to just cover content and move on, but at the same time, at least they have been exposed to the information. That way it is not completely foreign to them when learning it in the next grade.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I believe the title "hubs of learning" is appropriate. The focus is taken off the teacher and placed on the student. The authors describe their classrooms as several activities happening at the same time.
    Even though the responsibility for learning is placed on the students, there is a lot of preparation for the teacher in order for it to run smoothly.
    I like the way the assessments were set up but I too wonder how all of this would work in the elementary setting. I also wonder what happens when students don't judge properly and don't complete the necessary work by the allotted time given, let's say the end of a marking period, semester, end of year? Having checkpoints along the way as mentioned would definitely be needed.
    Teaching the students how to watch a video for learning and how to take notes is a very good suggestion as well.
    It would be interesting to get more feedback on how this flipped mastery program has worked in classrooms other than science which is such a hands-on subject.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I think that this sums up my thoughts perfectly! I agree with everything you have said here, especially the part about the students needing to motivate themselves. I see this as an issue for my class in particular. I have a class of students who are severely dependent on me, which is fine. We are working on being more independent, and in the lower elementary setting this is something that is still being taught to students. I think that this would be more difficult for me to achieve in my classroom, but I think that wiling continually conferencing with students and explicit instruction it would be doable in parts. For example, I could do this with one or two units at a time fairly easily I would imagine.

    ReplyDelete
  11. I,too, like the idea of the hubs of learning because it's cooperative learning with a real purpose. When students know something well enough to teach it or to really help someone else understand a concept, the teacher is assured those students understand the concepts with some depth.
    The classroom would be very busy, but well orchestrated this would be a great way to help the most learners. It would also help extend the able learner and allow him/her to move at his/her own pace.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment