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Chapter Four: How to Implement the Flipped Classroom


Chapter four delves into the nuts and bolts of flipping the classroom. First, the authors cover some of the equipment needs of the flipped classroom as well as the whole process of making a video. Most of these issues are actually questions that the MSD of Steuben County staff have addressed. Since we had a training day on utilizing video to leverage learning in September, many teachers are already using Screencastify to create videos and distribute them through Google Classroom, Google Drive, or Seesaw. If this chapter spurns some further questions, I can address those here. Feel free to ask. 

The rest of the chapter covers making videos interesting and also the suggestion that flipping the classroom will buy you time once it is set up. Select one or both of the following questions: 
  1. In what ways do you want to attempt to "make videos your students will love?"

  2. Do you envision that flipping will save you class time? How do you see yourself using this hypothetical time?

Comments

  1. I think I will work with instructional videos in which I give a demonstration on the use of tools and mediums used in the art room. Normally I do this at a big counter in my room with all of the students watching. (short students, tall students). Students could then replay and watch if there is a portion they didn't understand or missed if they were off task. Sometimes I use the "ask three then ask me" retort for something they missed but this would be so much easier for them to watch on their Chromebooks. If they had been absent from school they can easily stay caught up with the day's lesson.

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  2. In attempting to make the videos, I am still a bit camera shy. I do not like seeing myself on video, therefore I may try other ways, such as just recording my voice and using an interactive board if needed to present material. I was just commenting today to my students how helpful it would have been Friday to have done a Flipped model for our practice run of E-learning Day because I had to keep repeating myself and most of the students did not understand the instructions because they did not read them. Monday, I physically walked through the process of setting up the ELA interactive game I created for them to play Friday and they were able to follow along and finally understand it really was not that difficult if they had just read the game manual I provided. Now, if I had created a video demonstrating this, it would have saved so much time and Chatting with each student where I repeatedly told them to just take a moment to read. In the long run, I definitely believe flipping will save me time, only because I feel as though I am constantly repeating myself because someone was not listening or was absent.

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    1. Flipping is also very tricky because it does require a lot of time up front. Teachers that have jumped in full force have found this to be a big issue. In the end, it pays off. In the class, it pays off.

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  3. I will try to use flipped classroom method to introduce new projects to the students. That way they can go over the directions the night before and if they have any questions they can ask me the next day in class while other students who don't have questions can begin working on them. By doing this the students will have more time to work on the project in class and not have to do so much of it outside of class. Also, I'll have more time to help them with any troubles they may have.

    I have used screen cast for sub plans before and I liked it a lot. I was able to give the students the instructions of what needed to be done and do some noteshopping with them as well. The best part of it was I didn't have to rearrange my plans for the week. The day I was gone we were doing an Internet activity and I was able to walk themail through it step by step and I knew they were getting the.correct instructions.

    I'm not sure if flipping the classroom will truly save a lot of class time I believe it will give them more time to do work in class then what you traditionally been able to do. I believe it'll just make you as a teacher more available to the students to help them with any difficulties that they may have. That way they do not have to come in before school or after school when it's usually difficult for kids to find rides for that purpose. Again I've said this before flipping the classroom just going to make you as a teacher more available to the students that wouldn't be able to to get help from you before or after school

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    1. I think you've really hit the nail on the head here. It isn't about freeing up actual time. It is about how you can invest your time better. You aren't available if you lecture for an hour. It is guaranteed that you've lost most of them in that time span.

      I actually experience the same thing as a "technology coach." My time is better spent just meeting with individuals and answering their questions than giving after school sessions. Having a "sit and get" session after school is actually one of the most frustrating experiences for me. Very little learning actually takes place and individuals are frustrated by the pace of the session (whether too slow or too fast).

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  4. Since I am pushing into classrooms most of the time, I could see how becoming aware of topics my students struggle with then making videos could be helpful for them. Also, creating videos for students I pull out would definitely give more time to practice concepts introduced.
    I also like the steps listed to make videos. Having a music teaching background, the last step is a must. Making sure to follow copyright laws is very important. I'm afraid schools can be lax with this.

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    1. Great point about copyright. We also need to be teaching our students about that concept. Very few individuals understand that not all things on the Internet are "fair game."

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  5. First of all I wanted to make a comment about something in chapter four that was a bit of an 'ah-ha' moment for me. I never thought about utilizing this tool to show science experiments that would be too difficult or dangerous to do in the classroom. I then thought about all the time I have spent in the past finding adequate hooks for lessons online, and wondered if it would take much more time to completely teach a lesson to a screen. Teaching a computer is often a challenge, but honestly I feel as though this may be a great option for many of the students. I was thinking over break about the way in which our lessons roll out in the classroom and how our time is used during the day. I do think that in the end a flipped classroom would essentially add time to the school day. The time it will take to get started will seem daunting at first, but like all things it is a matter of practice and routine. This extra time could be used to go even deeper with topics, and would allow more time for individualized help in the classroom.

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    1. This makes me think about when I watch a Youtube video on the steps to a task. I constantly pause and rewind so that I can make sure that I've followed the steps correctly. I imagine you would go through fewer supplies for your experiment if all the students had the capability to watch the experience over and over! :)

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  6. I am not comfortable making videos, but have found that students enjoy watching, and learning that works with my lessons. Edpuzzle.com has become a favorite site. While students are working, I will be able to use the time to meet with individual and small groups

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  7. 1. In Math, my students always need help with the harder (x) processes & long division. I would love to make demo videos showing the processes the way the parents know it, so they can review with their awesome 4th Graders at home to help them gain confidence.

    2. Yes... Ss can watch the videos as much as needed to learn Math computation solving & learn to explain their process steps they used., then justify their answers. I can use the time gained to Math Conference w/ students to determine needs & plan for differentiation.
    Brilliant!

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  8. Further spurning Q's:
    Lance, would you be able to send me, or demo for us an example teacher-made video from you (or anyone) "my students will love?" Ex: Math problem demo, identifying adverbs in texts etc. similar to EdPuzzle vids but amateur. Thank you!
    Thank you !

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    1. I don't have a third grade one, but here is a video I made last year for Kindergarten teachers. :) http://www.showme.com/sh/?h=WbvyCRs

      I actually lost all my videos I made for fourth graders. It was all tied to Everyday Math, so I didn't think it was significant anymore. Whoops...

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  9. I am still very nervous about making my own videos. I don't want to be in front of the camera, but I like the challenge of trying to make the videos engaging, enjoyable, and exciting. I think with practice and student feedback, all of our videos will "get better" with time.

    I agree with Mike and Ann about class time. I envision these videos allowing more time to truly differentiate activities in the classroom.

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  10. I tried to make some recordings for days I would be absent. Although it went well, I want to figure out a way to make my videos more engaging and find a way to hold them accountable for watching them. Some students admitted to me that they just fast forwarded to the end and copied down the notes.

    Also, I always do my best lesson third or fourth period (beauty of Middle School), so I am thinking about using that to my advantage and having my advanced class (that I want to flip) one day behind the rest of my classes. That way I can record the lesson during my prep and have my best version available for their homework. If I record it during my prep, it will also be available to the students from my traditional classes going home to work on homework that night. Then next year, I will already have second semester lessons recorded. Maybe then I'll be ready to try flipping all my classes.

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    1. I'm glad you brought up the accountability issue. I don't know that there is a "silver bullet" to it. Just like starting anything new, there are going to be hiccups and you'll eventually figure out how to build the culture and mold it the way you want. For now, there are tools like EdPuzzle and Educannon that allow you to ask questions in the middle of a video. The students cannot move forward in the video until they answer the question. After they have answered the questions, they can move to any point in the video that they'd like.

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  11. So far, I don't think I will feel comfortable making videos. I am do think videos will help my class, but up to this point I have spent a lot of time searching for videos that I thought were well done and relevant to my class objectives, while interesting to the students. I may be willing to do a screen-castify or something like that. I have used Edpuzzle to make them accountable, although I had more luck with my freshmen than my upper-level students.

    I think it will save time by giving students a link to something they can watch and then ask questions afterward in response to the question "Did you do anything when I was gone? Did I miss anything? Students who don't get something can go back and watch it again. Or pause when they need to, and it won't have to involve me personally.

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  12. I would like to use video lessons of basic skill work that I have previously taught so struggling students and parents can view them as many times as needed for mastery. What is the best location for accessibility to these videos?

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