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Book Study: Flip Your Classroom Chapters 1-3


The first three chapters give mostly an overview and the reasoning behind the concept of "flipping" the classroom. As Aaron Sams and Jonathan Bergmann delve into their reasoning, they also point out some poor reasons for wanting to flip the classroom. 

In the comments section below this post, think about reasons why you should and shouldn't consider flipping the classroom. After reading the first three chapters, do you feel that this model is something that will benefit your students? Is a full flip appropriate for your students, or are there just elements that you can take from this study? 

If you had something else in the forefront of your mind instead of the question I'm asking, feel free to post that instead. Please give a disclaimer that you are headed in a different direction if you choose to do so. Also, please feel free to reply to your colleagues' comments. Ask questions or throw in your two cents. Later this week I will likely throw out a reminder email asking you to revisit the post to see what others had to say. 

Next week, we will tackle only chapter four. 

Thanks again for participating. I'm excited to learn with you! 

Comments

  1. Should: *saves time
    * helps absents or need-agains
    *good for kids to see modeling/hear Teacher
    *change is good
    *students like format
    *Great for Sub plans

    Shouldn't: *maybe not a lot of supervision at home
    *some parents don't like Tech/videos
    *not all Ss have devices @ home

    Benefit: *Yes, Ss learn well this way today
    *this screen time is helpful/Ss learn standard topics
    *Ss are busy & can catch up/review on their time schedule
    *Pause & rewind helps all learning modalities
    *Fun & new

    Full Flip: * Just elements to start w/ my 4th's, then build up to more as year progresses
    *I Like the "parent teaching" element: I hear all the time "We call it different things now i.e. Math concepts/procedures
    *E-Learning days could be so accessible, handy to those w/ devices/service

    Questions: *Anyone have any example flips/Screencastify clips I can view for ideas of how other Teachers do their recordings?
    *Anyone have more differentiation ideas with this concept?

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    1. Marianne, I'm very curious by what you mean by the part where you mention that "this screen time is helpful" as usually screen time and helpful usually aren't in the same sentence. I think I know what you mean, but just wanted to see what you had to say by expounding upon it. :)

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    2. Hello!
      I would just set my recorder or webcam on my laptop, just depends where I felt like doing my lesson. I taught as if my students were in front of me, anticipating possible questions that might come up, as well as being creative.

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  2. This year for the first time ever I had my students view a 2.5 minute instruction that my grandson recorded of me for my Intro to 2D class. While not MY student he acquired skill in creating a purposeful clip that we uploaded to Google Classroom.

    Teaching a lab type class to begin with I have lots of opportunity to sit down and converse with my students to get to know a lot of them in a personal way; we often look at video clips and then discuss them in class. Where I fall short is in creating my own. How can I make them interesting without feeling like I am on stage. I hate that part or even just thinking about that part of being in front of a camera! I am 60 years old and have for my entire life never spoken into a microphone of have my face intentionally be in a video! The thought makes me quiver!

    When I had my grandson video me it was just of my hands because of my nervousness. I reasoned that my hands were actually all that was necessary. Can I keep this up forever?
    I teach 4 different classes in 7 periods a day. Am I being stubborn or am I just lazy in trying to reason how long it would take to flip even one of these classes? How many videos can one person make? Where do I find the time to do this? Often I just provide video links to my students for instructional exercises on Youtube. Generally though, I have to add verbal instruction to my students to add to the information they get from the video. Can I legally just talk over the youtube video with screencastify? I do not know.

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    1. I love how transparent you are being in your response. I think you have very legitimate concerns and it speaks volumes that you are participating. Flipping the classroom isn't for everyone. Nor do I believe in everything said in the text. It sounds as if you are already utilizing elements of it through existing videos. There is nothing wrong with using someone else's videos if they fit your needs. Why reinvent the wheel? Time is certainly a factor. You'll find later in this text that the author discusses the number of years they spent attempting to perfect the process to the point that they felt comfortable. I don't believe you "fall short" because you don't make your own videos. Making a video certainly does not determine your value as a teacher.

      As far as recording over a Youtube video, I suggest contacting the creator of the video through the comments. Ask for permission to use it in class but assure them you won't post it on Youtube yourself.

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    2. Wow! Thanks for the quick response. I want to use as many types of "teaching" as possible. We get so many different students with just as many various backgrounds as the examples in the book!

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  3. Would flipping my second grade classroom benefit my students? YES!
    --great for students who need reteaching and additional modeling
    --pause the teacher
    --absent students
    --digital globalization
    --sub plans
    --differentiation
    --student-student interaction
    --exposure to content
    --parent involvement
    --student videos
    --attention on the learner and learning

    Ideas to think about...
    --technology at home
    --lack of parent involvement
    --allocation of school time versus family time
    --immediate questioning and responses

    I am anxious and excited to start flipping my second grade classroom...slowly.

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    1. Erin, I think you make a very valid point about the "allocation of school time versus family time" as my wife and I were just discussing the amount of homework our daughter has each night. There does need to be balance. In some ways, I think doing a flipped math class with a 4-5 minute video and then a sample problem would be much more beneficial than the 20-30 math problems on a worksheet. At the same time, I always struggled with the whole concept of homework. When I taught 4th grade, I mostly wanted my kids reading for homework more than anything. There is a lot of research out there that suggests that homework is not beneficial...especially if a child doesn't understand. A flipped scenario could make homework more efficient and effective. Good points.

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  4. Lance,
    I see lots of exciting potential in flipping a classroom. I am just wondering what happens when students consistently never view the lesson before coming to class? Wouldn't they get even farther behind than in a traditional classroom?

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    1. Great question, Julie. I know this is a reality for our teachers that have already attempted this process. Some teachers allow the students to watch the videos in class, but that seems to defeat the purpose. Maybe it would be more beneficial to differentiate through video and essentially only flip the whole class less portion? It'll be interesting for you to read as the author gets more and more into flipped mastery learning. It seems like an exciting way to provide content for students. :)

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    2. I find the idea of flipping very intriguing. I work with ELL students and spend most of my time pushing-in to the classrooms. I do also pull a few students. I think it would be interesting to try. I also like the idea mentioned of recording books for students to listen to at home.

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    3. I also like the idea of students being able to pause the teacher and lIsten again. I do wonder if students will take the initiative to actually watch the videos. Will parents follow through and as already mentioned, what about students without devices? I know in some schools, students take their devices home.

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    4. Good points, Jean. You'll find eventually in this book that the author did "flipping the classroom" back in the day before a 1:1 initiative was so popular. It is crazy to think that they made DVDs for all their students. Could you imagine the amount of time it would take to burn all those DVDs for students?

      Also, training students to watch a video actually needs to take place. Most people are not accustomed to the idea of watching a video for the purpose of learning. It is a different mindset than watching TV, Youtube, or a movie on Netflix. Building a culture around watching video content for the purpose of learning takes time. It is by no means a silver bullet.

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    5. Jean, It works well with our students!

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  5. This has given me many interesting ideas to ponder. I have started the blended learning this year in class, mostly math. My students use the Pearson videos in a transition time during class to "see" the lesson for the first time. I then use a ticket out procedure to check for understanding. I have 2 problems posted on classroom that they answer on a white board that I can check when I have a minute to see who gets it. Then those who don't "get it" (or Julie, those who don't watch it if it was a homework assignment) will come to me for a reteach in whole group. This way those who can move on, do. Those who need the extra help get it.

    I started thinking about the bigger picture they presented of learning at your own pace. It really made me think about how much content I could get through with some of my high students if they weren't held back by everyone else's timetable. On the flip side, what do I do if I am waiting for mastery before moving on with my strugglers and those students only get through half the content for the year? Is it more important to leave with mastery in a few topics or a little knowledge of everything? I love the idea and can even see how it would work. All the materials are there for me to set this up: camera, sample problems, websites, and all the tests can be assigned individually on Pearson. I could also use the whole class model where everyone continues on, but again, reteaching often means more practice/homework for those students who are already frustrated. They don't need multiple lessons going on at one time, the old they struggled with and what we are currently working on. What is a good solution?

    Any suggestions for this idea outside of a science or math? It just makes more sense to me to use this for concrete concepts. I can't wrap my head around what to do with topics that are subjective to each person's ideas.
    Another point that occurred to me is how much time will a student spend "watching" their next day's lessons? If every subject was flipped, even if the lessons were only 10 minutes each, could add up to a lot of time. The elementary level would be tough, but our lessons would be much shorter. There is the possibility of hours of lessons each night in high school if each teacher chooses to flip.
    I really feel this could open a whole new concept in my class where every student is getting what they need. So far, the model I have been using has been working. Every student has show growth in each topic in math, but certainly not mastery. I do have a lot of data to use to drive the lessons and to show to students and parents about their process. However, it is scary to think of breaking away from the method of everyone doing the same main lesson. And I think the kids would welcome it, if they were "trained" at the beginning to know that we all work at our own pace. This is something my 5th graders have figured out on their own, no one needs to tell them.

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    1. Wow Amy, you left a lot to think about here. I probably can't address it all, but I'll attempt to at least discuss your question about math and science vs. teaching literacy. I guess it mostly depends upon how you teach. I used to teach fourth grade and focused on the seven keys of comprehension. I would focus on the keys as reading strategies and model how to use them in a text. Essentially, I could have recorded all those mini-lessons while I taught them in succession and then used them the following year for mastery learning. Students could have proven their mastery through a blog or digital portfolio showing their evidence of how they utilized the strategies or literary elements. Does that help? Maybe this year could be dedicated to building your resources?

      To be honest, this is one of the disadvantages of coming in as an outsider. I don't fully know your curriculum. I never used a book series for reading instruction. I'm a firm believer in building a culture of readers. One of my favorite books of all time is The Book Whisperer by Donalyn Miller.

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  6. I definitely feel a Flipped Classroom model would work with my students mainly because I have done it with high school students, as well as, at Trine on a number of occasions. I like the idea and think it would benefit those especially who are distracted socially and those who maybe are more advanced or those that need extra reinforcement. When I developed mathematics courses and then taught them via online to high school students all over the world, students were able to go at their own pace and were very successful. I kept scheduled hours for those that needed more via an interactive whiteboard, telephone, chat, email, etc...where I could work one on one with students. A flipped model does leave time for more one-on-one time and more hands-on time. The only question that comes up with current situation, would be what to do for students who do not have Internet access at their home. What do they do?

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    1. Great question Lara. The content would need to be downloaded directly to their device so that they can at least watch the video and either complete a task through paper/pencil or write in a Google Doc. Google Docs are available offline on the Chromebook.

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  7. What I like the most about the idea of a flipped classroom is the availability of a teacher outside of the classroom. Being a coach in the spring time our teams sometimes have to leave early from school and student miss out on valuable instructional time in their class. By having a flipped class the student would be able to get the part of the lesson that they missed in class at home later that night.

    THe other benefit of flipping the classroom would be when students are absent from class or when you as the teacher are gone as well. I don't know how many times a student has come up to me after being absent from class and ask “Did I miss anything important?” or “What did we do yesterday?” Then you are trying to get them caught up and make sure that they don't fall behind. By flipping the classroom students would be able to watch the lesson online and come into class not missing a beat. All you would have to do as a teacher is clear up any questions that they may have and that can be done before or after school. I like the idea of pre recording my lesson for when I would be absent from class. I know in the months of Jan & Feb I attend some coaching clinics and have always worried if the substitute understood what I wanted done or do I let them give some of the lecture that was meant for that day. Now I wouldn’t have to worry about that. I can still be the one giving the lesson and know that it is being done the way I want it to be done and deliver in the manor that I wanted to be delivered.

    I don’t like the idea of flipping the classroom for the whole period if I was in the classroom. I can see doing it for parts of the period if the lesson called for it. I know that it would help students who may struggle with taking notes and students with special needs. That way they are learning at their pace. I know that is one of the biggest struggles that I have in my social studies classes is make sure that I don’t go too fast or too slow with notes. By having your classed flipped students then can use that pause or rewind button to help them better.

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  8. What I like the most about the idea of a flipped classroom is the availability of a teacher outside of the classroom. Being a coach in the spring time our teams sometimes have to leave early from school and student miss out on valuable instructional time in their class. By having a flipped class the student would be able to get the part of the lesson that they missed in class at home later that night.

    THe other benefit of flipping the classroom would be when students are absent from class or when you as the teacher are gone as well. I don't know how many times a student has come up to me after being absent from class and ask “Did I miss anything important?” or “What did we do yesterday?” Then you are trying to get them caught up and make sure that they don't fall behind. By flipping the classroom students would be able to watch the lesson online and come into class not missing a beat. All you would have to do as a teacher is clear up any questions that they may have and that can be done before or after school. I like the idea of pre recording my lesson for when I would be absent from class. I know in the months of Jan & Feb I attend some coaching clinics and have always worried if the substitute understood what I wanted done or do I let them give some of the lecture that was meant for that day. Now I wouldn’t have to worry about that. I can still be the one giving the lesson and know that it is being done the way I want it to be done and deliver in the manor that I wanted to be delivered.

    I don’t like the idea of flipping the classroom for the whole period if I was in the classroom. I can see doing it for parts of the period if the lesson called for it. I know that it would help students who may struggle with taking notes and students with special needs. That way they are learning at their pace. I know that is one of the biggest struggles that I have in my social studies classes is make sure that I don’t go too fast or too slow with notes. By having your classed flipped students then can use that pause or rewind button to help them better.

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  9. Outside of the classroom help seems to be a big benefit to me as well Mike

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  10. Some interesting thoughts from Chapter 1-3
    Embrace digital learning... join "their" world.
    Kids can pause a video... not a teacher.
    Know our kids better!!!! increase student/teacher interaction.
    Teacher in Tutorial mode...not presenter mode.Helping students not just delivering info!
    Lastly, increase student to student interaction... what a beautiful thing!!!
    I like what I'm reading... need lots more info for sure!!

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  11. I'm very excited about trying this out with my advanced math class second semester. I am hopeful that they will be self directed and take full advantage of the format. I think I will be able to challenge them with higher level problems in class because I will be there to support them. I do not like giving those type of problems as homework. I will make the videos available to all my classes (to help with homework and absences), but I want to start slow this year!

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  12. I think this seems like a great idea, but would like to see an example of one with first graders. I do have some concerns though: extra time creating videos, students not having technology at home, or not viewing videos. I see some wonderful benefits especially with the high ability students.
    Jen Wiggins

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  13. I'm interested in how first graders would use this, especially since we don't take our devices home. I'd like to see some examples of this working in an early ed class. I see this as being a great resource for the low students being able to rewatch, the high ability moving at their own pace, and the absent students since so much of what we do can't be just sent home to make up. Another concern is time.

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  14. I have always been intrigued by the idea of using a flipped classroom setup, though have always wondered how it would rule out in the lower/middle elementary classroom. I also favor the student's ability to pause the lesson and re-watch it as many times as the students need to.

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  15. Ok, so, on Friday, I tried to post my comments on this page, but my Internet disconnected and I lost everything I had typed! Yes, I was at school and my computer seems to lose connection frequently. I talked to a colleague about how I should maybe put it on a Google doc and paste it in....probably a good idea, since anything not published is lost!

    I think there are advantages to flipping some things, but I am closer to a blended classroom than I am a total flip, not even a somersault, just a forward roll. It would take a great deal of advanced planning to have everything ready to go sequentially, activities, videos, presentations, quizzes, tests, etc. I don't see that happening right now. I have not created my own videos yet. I do use others' videos and spend a huge amount of time just previewing and decided which would work for my classes. I post everything I can in Google Classroom so students can go back and watch as many times as needed. I am not comfortable recording myself explaining the lessons.

    In the past (and in the present) have found that even when I ask them to read or watch something before coming to class, a small percentage of them do (usually the ones who understand the first time something is presented). I recently had students create a Google Slide Show in Spanish comparing their lives when they were little to their lives now. Some of these were really cute because they had used real pictures of themselves then and now (although it wasn't required). The over-riding theme from them was how stressed they are now because they have so much to do all the time. They work, they participate in many activities, they have homework, family commitments and obligations and they complained about their lack of "free time". They miss "being kids". In the past, as a parent of teenagers, I saw that as well.

    If they had all of these lessons to watch before class, for all their classes, some would be over the edge! On Friday, we had a practice e-learning day and besides the difficulty with the overload on the Internet, the students felt the teachers had given them too much. Some asked it we couldn't just do it in class.

    I have given them many links to more practice, explanations, game sites related to our content and found they maybe tried it when I introduced them, and a couple times after that, but, unless I was giving them points for doing it, they really didn't seek them out.

    I think I would like to try some aspects of it, but I am not ready to totally flip yet,

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