Wednesday, December 19, 2012

Story Kit for Science Observations?


I know I frequently reference Story Kit on this blog. However, I thought it would be worthy of your time to see how flexible apps on the iPod Touch or iPad really are.
I am posting an example of how first graders were recording their science experiments with a worm bin. Mrs. Munk from the Kendallville Public Library provided Mrs. Yoder from Avilla with a worm bin. To record their observations, they took a picture within Story Kit. After they took their picture, a sentence was written to describe the picture. (You could also rely on audio recordings.)


Overall, I thought it was an excellent idea.

Checkout this example:

storkit

Perfect Captions


I placed Perfect Captions in Presentation Tools because it really does not apply to a specific subject area. It really could be used for any subject. I recently have used Perfect Captions with several first grade classrooms. Students can use it to share a picture of their learning, or a picture that the teacher has provided for a project. The student then can place text directly on the picture.
Wifth first grade students, I had students create their own book reviews to introduce it. They took a picture of the book's cover, and wrote a sentence to share what they like about the book. Please also keep in mind that this is the first time they have used the app. It does take a little practice.
Here are several examples of a student work:


Perfect Captions


I also did this with a first grade class to make a Christmas card. For this class, I had a set of pictures that I collected in a Box.com shared folder. I taught the kids how to download the pictures to their device. They then imported the picture from their camera roll, and typed a holiday message. It was a fun, first project using the application. The students quickly caught on to using it and were able to make a Christmas card in a short period of time. Here is an example of a Christmas Card they made:


Perfect captions christmas

Monday, December 10, 2012

Long Division Touch


Long Division Touch focuses on the standard algorithm. It gives step-by-step directions. It also give students practice time without all the detailed steps. A valuable tool for students that need to go through the process through another avenue. It may also be a good tool for teaching the process for teachers that are not in a 1:1 school district using iPads or iPods.

Thursday, December 6, 2012

ScootPad



ScootPad is a resource that allows students to practice mathematics and language skills. The activities are more skill and drill, but the data is very valuable. For students that are not able to read fluently, it does have a feature that will read the questions aloud. However, students using the website will need to learn to be patient when using it. The sound does not play instantaneously; it will require a few seconds of wait time.

For those of you that are familiar with SumDog, the account creation process is very similar. The teacher must create an account; then create their student accounts according to grade level needs.

There is an iPad app available for free to download. The app does not work on the iPod touch, but with some training, younger students could use the website to accomplish the tasks. I included a link on the East Noble First Grade Symbaloo site.

Go Animate!



Go Animate is a fun resource to use. Students typically think of it as more of a thing for entertainment purposes. However, if you click here, you will find a great example of how it can be used as an instructional resource. Mrs. Ortiz's students used it to tell about the plot structure of the book, Hatchet by Gary Paulsen. What a fun and exciting way to integrate technology into the classroom.